If you need further advice, please don't hesitate to call us on 0490-355-360.

Frequent Questions

Do I need to lodge an application for the removal of vegatation on my property?


There may be times when you need to lodge an application with Council before you can remove vegetation from your property. The Gold Coast City Council's website states that "If a land owner wishes to remove or damage any protected vegetation on their property, submission of an application may be required." You can use their checklist to find out if an application is required: Do I need to lodge an application for the removal of vegetation on my property?




Are some trees protected?


Yes. Heritage trees are often outstanding examples of their kind and their age and size means that they are generally rare on the Gold Coast. These trees play an important role in understanding and appreciating the history and heritage of the City. The Gold Coast City Council's website states that "If a land owner wishes to remove or damage any protected vegetation on their property, submission of an application may be required." You can use their checklist to find out if an application is required: Do I need to lodge an application for the removal of vegetation on my property?




How can I check if a tree is protected?


The Gold Coast Local Heritage Register protects a variety of heritage trees and other significant vegetation through provisions in the Queensland Heritage Act 1992. These trees are also noted on the National Trust’s Register of Significant Trees. There are also trees on the Gold Coast which have been recognised as having State significance. These trees are entered in the Queensland Heritage Register. When gathering information about whether or not your tree is a protected tree, it is recommended that you ask for details in writing.




If my neighbours tree overhangs my fence, do they have to pay for the trimming?


They should pay to trim back branches on your side of the fence if you ask them to. If you are able to come to an agreement with your neighbour for them to pay for an arborist to cut back overhanging branches, that's great. However, if not read on. The Queensland Government law website says: If your neighbour’s tree is causing you problems and you have not been able to come to an agreement by talking to your neighbour, you can give them a notice to remove the problem branches, using a Form 3 - Notice for removal of particular overhanging branches. This applies only where branches overhang more than 50cm and are less than 2.5m above the ground—and to trees not covered by a vegetation protection order (a local council order protecting a tree from having its branches lopped (cut off). The notice must:

  • state a time by which the branches must be removed (at least 30 days from the date your neighbour receives the notice)
  • ask your neighbour to give at least 1 day’s written notice of when the branches will be removed, showing
    • who will do the work
    • the day it will happen
  • give permission to your neighbour or their contractor to enter your land on the agreed day between 8am and 5pm
  • include at least 1 written quote for the cost of the work and a copy of Part 4 of the Act.
If your neighbour does not remove the branches by the specified time, you can remove them yourself or have a contactor remove them at your neighbour’s expense—they are liable to pay up to $300 a year for removing branches from their trees.




Do I need my neighbour's permission to cut back their trees on my side of the fence?


The Queensland Government Law website says: If you have a neighbour’s tree hanging over your land, you can:

  • exercise the common law right of abatement—your right to remove overhanging branches and roots to your boundary line
  • decide whether to return the lopped branches, roots or fruit to your neighbour, or dispose of them yourself. You do not have to return anything you trim from the neighbour’s tree but you may do so.
When exercising the right of abatement, take care to comply with any applicable tree or vegetation protection orders.




Can I throw back my neighbours branches and palm fronds?


Qld law states that you do not have to return branches from trees which have fallen into your yard, back over the fence to your neighbours, but you can. It would be wise however to let your neighbour know that you intend to do this before you do so, if only in the interest of remaining friendly with them.




I'm in dispute with my neighbours about trees on our fenceline, what do I do?


If you are involved in a civil dispute involving trees and vegetation, the information onthe Gold Coast City Council's website will assist in resolving the dispute. Advice on civil disputes involving vegetation & trees.




If you do a job at my property can I keep the mulch?


Sure. Just let us know when you accept our quote.




What equipment do you have?


We have all sizes of Stihl chainsaws to manage any size job. We have a 12 inch Vermeer chipper and a Hino tipper truck which holds 16 cubic metres of mulch. (See the question above about keeping your mulch). We can do hedging jobs all the way to block clearing jobs and everything in between.